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Divisions and Committees

GeoBytes

Upcoming Seminars

 GeoBytes are free online seminars presented by ASPRS and sponsered by the ASPRS GIS Division, in cooperation with CaGIS and GLIS

 

Attention those seeking ASPRS Certification: ASPRS Online Seminars are a great way to gain Professional Development Hours!

Scheduled seminars for 2015

Relationship of and transformations between most common reference frames used in the U.S, January 30, 2014

To register, click here

Abstract: This presentation will cover the relationship of and transformations between the several geometric and vertical geodetic reference frames most commonly used in the United States. These include: The North American Datum of 1927 (NAD 27), the North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83), the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF), the World Geodetic System of 1984 (WGS 84), the National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 (NGVD 29) and the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD). The program will specifically examine tools such as the gridded utilities NADCON and VERTCON developed by the National Geodetic Survey (NGS), as well as the commonly used 3-parameter abridged Molodensky transformations originally computed by the U.S. Defense Mapping Agency (DMA) and the more rigorous 14-parameter transformations supported by the NGS utility HTDP (Horizontal Time Dependent Positioning).

Bio: Dave Doyle joined the National Geodetic Survey in 1972, and held the position of chief geodetic surveyor for twelve years prior to his retirement in January 2013. He was responsible for the development, technical design and management of plans and programs that enhanced the United States National Spatial Reference System. During his career with NGS his experiences included all phases of geodetic triangulation, astronomic positioning, leveling, GPS data collection, data analysis, datum transformations, network adjustments, data publication and outreach in the form of seminars, workshops and webinars. His efforts also included extensive activities to direct and coordinate the modernization of national geodetic reference frames in countries in Africa, Central, Caribbean and South America, Eastern Europe and the Pacific.

Mr. Doyle is a Past President of the American Association for Geodetic Surveying, a Fellow member of the American Congress on Surveying and Mapping, has served on the U.S. delegation to the International Federation of Surveyors and is an active member of the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia professional surveyors associations.

 

Building Detection using EO, Lidar, and GEOBIA, February 27, 2015

To register, click here

Abstract: "This seminar will discuss the detection of buildings using electro-optical (EO) and lidar data by applying Geographic Object-Based Image Analysis (GEOBIA) techniques. Pre-processing, analysis, and post-processing are illustrated. Accuracy assessment using a manually derived validation referent and calculation of performance metrics are also discussed."

Bio: Dr. Pope is an R&D scientist in the Space & Remote Sensing Sciences group at Los Alamos National Laboratory. He develops, tests, and applies photogrammetric and geoinformatic techniques to assist in a variety of terrestrial, airborne, and space-based remote sensing projects. He serves as the Spectral and Geospatial Sensing team leader for this group. He has served as principal investigator on a variety of projects seeking to improve and expand national and homeland security capabilities. He holds a BS degree in Physics, an MS in Aerospace Engineering, and a Ph.D. in Environmental Monitoring: Remote Sensing and Spatial Information, and is an ASPRS certified mapping scientist in remote sensing."

 

Volume Visualization for Lidar: Using Voxels, March 20, 2015

To register, click here

Abstract: This presentation will contain a brief overview of how airborne lidar data are currently collected, how errors and uncertainties are propagated through these systems, and how users typically convert this 3D remote sensing data into information. We will discuss in detail a novel method of volume visualization, and how the voxel may be an excellent way to represent, visualize and model 3D information from lidar instruments, as compared to point and surface representations.

Bio: Jason Stoker is a US Geological Survey Physical Scientist and is the Elevation Products and Services Manager helping guide the direction of the 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) for the National Geospatial Program. Prior to this position, for over twelve years he led the lidar research and development activities at USGS EROS Center in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. He was the founder of CLICK: the USGS Center for Lidar Information Coordination and Knowledge. Jason is currently the Assistant Director of the Lidar Division of the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS). 

 

Using LiDAR to Study Forests, April 17, 2015

To register, click here

Abstract: Natural resource managers are increasingly using airborne LiDAR to study forests to conduct inventories, assess habitat, study fires and fuels, monitor changes, and study ecological processes. This seminar will look at LiDAR’s strengths and weaknesses compared to other remote sensing methods to measure forests across landscapes. We will cover how LiDAR measures forests and how managers can process LiDAR data to measure their forests. We will also cover how to work with a LiDAR vendor to acquire data for forest studies and how to relate LiDAR measures with forest measurements gathered on the ground. In many cases, LiDAR data is gathered for non-forest studies (such as studying ground morphology);we will discuss how to use these common data sets to also study forests.

Bio: Van R. Kane, PhD, at the University of Washington has been using LiDAR data to study a diverse range of forests for nearly a decade. His work includes assisting managers to plan forest restorations, study the effects of fire on forests, measuring fuels, mapping forest biomass, and developing methods to study forests with LiDAR data.

A Discussion of the USGS Base Lidar Specification, v. 2.0, June 19, 2015

To register, click here

Abstract: The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Geospatial Program (NGP) Lidar Base Specification Version 1.0 was published in early 2012, and revised as Version 1.1 in 2014. The notable revisions in version 1.1 were definitions for 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) Quality Levels, alignment with the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing Positional Accuracy Standards for Digital Geospatial Data, updating the delivery format to LAS version 1.4, and clarification of several requirements. The version 2.0 update will further align with new industry standards and best practices, define requirements for additional 3DEP products and services, and address new lidar technologies.

As a cooperative effort of the 3DEP and the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) program, the NGP is developing a common data dictionary for both topographic and hydrologic breaklines. The goal is to enhance the integration of the NHD and 3DEP elevation products by enabling the use of common linework to the highest degree possible. This data dictionary is the most exciting update to the specification. Although 3DEP lidar projects require only minimal hydrographic breaklines to be collected for hydro-flattening, those features will be consistently formatted and immediately usable by the NHD as well. 

This presentation will preview the changes from version 1.1 to version 2.0 and provide an opportunity for attendees to have questions about the specification answered.

Bio: Karl Heidemann has worked in the lidar industry for over 15 years as a user, data provider, and software architect. He currently is a member of the Topographic Sciences Team at the USGS EROS Data Center. Mr. Heidemann currently chairs the ASPRS Airborne Lidar Committee, is the author of the USGS-NGP Lidar Base Specification, and is a contributing author to the ASPRS Manual of Airborne Topographic Lidar, the ASPRS Positional Accuracy Standards for Digital Geospatial Data, the ASPRS Airborne Topographic Lidar Manual, and the forthcoming 3rd Edition of The DEM User's Manual.

USGS Science Data Catalog – Data Visualization, Discovery and Use, August 28, 2015

To register, click here

Abstract: The Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) White House Open Data Policies (2013) have required Federal agencies to establish formal catalogues of their science data holdings and make these data easily available on Web sites, portals, and applications. As an organization, the USGS has historically excelled at making its data holdings freely available on its various Web sites (i.e., National, Scientific Programs, or local Science Center). In response to these requirements, the USGS Core Science Analytics, Synthesis, and Libraries program, in collaboration with DOE’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Mercury Consortium (funded by NASA, USGS, and DOE), and a number of other USGS organizations, established the Science Data Catalog (http://data.usgs.gov) cyberinfrastructure, content management processes/tools, and supporting policies. The USGS Science Data Catalog led the charge at USGS to improve the robustness of existing/future metadata collections; develop mechanisms to perform automatic data visualization using services; streamline and develop sustainable publishing to external aggregators (i.e., data.gov); and provide leadership to the U.S. Department of Interior in emerging Open Data policies, techniques, and systems. 

The session will focus on the USGS SDC current approaches to data visualization, discovery of USGS data resources, and aiding in the use of USGS data services by multiple stakeholder organizations. 

Bio: Mike Frame is Chief of Computational Science, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). He is responsible for enabling better use and application of scientific data through developing data access/interoperability strategies and the implementation of technologies such as: knowledge portals, data integration tools, analysis/visualization technologies, geospatial applications, standards, and indexing/discovery methods. He has served as Principle Investigator on several US National Science Foundation projects, international councils, and initiatives.

 

GNSS Derived Heights, November 20, 2015

To register, click here

Abstract: Geospatial practitioners have several methods to produce precise and accurate horizontal data from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). However, the vertical data produced are typically 1.5 to 2.5 times less precise and require more attention to produce survey grade results. When our new national vertical (geopotential) datum is rolled out around 2022, the primary access to the datum “truth” will be by remote means to the national CORS network, as opposed to using NAVD 88 marks in the ground published in the NGS integrated database. Many users will also access the new datum from other active stations aligned to the National Spatial Reference System (NSRS) - especially real time networks. This lunchtime talk will take a brief look at the static and near real time methods that may enable us to obtain survey grade orthometric heights from GNSS, both now and into the near future.

Bio: William Henning, Prof.LS., is a Registered Professional Land Surveyor with over 46 years of active experience in all phases of the land surveying profession. He has been actively involved with education/outreach to the geospatial community for 20 years, presenting over 130 talks and workshops on surveying and GNSS technology. Mr. Henning has authored articles for professional journals and trade magazines on GNSS positioning as well as authoring an extensive guideline document on single base real-time GNSS positioning and spearheading a real-time network guideline document, while working at NOAA’s National Geodetic Survey (NGS). He has trained various federal and local personnel in using GNSS equipment and correct positioning techniques. He has been the project lead for new height modernization geodetic networks in county-wide projects in the U.S., where he planned, helped construct, processed, adjusted and managed new geodetic control systems using NGS guidelines. He has over 20 years experience working with various GNSS manufacturers’ real- time positioning systems. Mr. Henning is Past President of the American Association for Geodetic Surveying (AAGS) and is an ACSM/AAGS Fellow. He has been presented with the NOAA Administrator’s Award for outstanding accomplishment in producing real time GNSS guidelines. He is currently retired from the NGS, where as a Geodesist he helped develop guidelines and support methodology for real time GNSS positioning with state, national and international organizations. He is currently working in private industry as the Geospatial Manager for George William Stephens, Jr. & Associates, Inc. and as a faculty member for Geo-Learn, Inc., where he is recording instructional videos for the use of surveyors, engineers and other geospatial professionals. Mr. Henning was awarded the Maryland Society of Surveyors “Surveyor of the Year” for 2013-14.

 

 

 

Registration

 

Registration:

Emails for upcoming seminars are sent to all ASPRS, CaGIS and GLIS members with the registration link.  Just click on the clink in the email to get to the online registration for each seminar.  Please note that slots for the live seminar are limited to 95 so register early to be assured you are approved.  It is also important that if you register for a seminar that you do attend as there are more people interested in the live seminars than there are slots available to accommodate everyone.  After the live seminars have aired, a videotape of the seminar will be posted below.

 

 

 

Past Seminars

 Past Seminars -- to view the video, click on the title of the seminar

 2014

Building an Agile, Modern, and Open Geospatial Platform
Presenter: Nathaniel Irwin
Held January, 2014

NHD Applications Utilizing StreamStats
February 28, 2014
Presenter: Peter A Steeves

Modernization of the National Spatial Reference System
March 14, 2014
Presenter: Dave Doyle 

Beyond Visualization: Enabling 3D Spatial Analysis of Vector Geometry
April 11, 2014
Presenters: Tom Watson and Michael Martin

Landscape Disturbance Related to Natural Gas Extraction in the Mid-Atlantic Region
June 20, 2014
Presenter: Terry Slonecker

Terrestrial and Aerial LIDAR for the Measurement and Monitoring of Forest Ecosystem Services
Presenter: Monika Moskal
Held June 27, 2014

An Overview of Considerations and Methodologies for High Resolution Land Cover Mapping
Presenter: Chris Robinson
Held July 25, 2014

Mapping Grade Products from the Unmanned Aerial System: The photogrammetric Approach
Held August 29, 2014

Free and Open Source Software and Web Services specializing in the Water Resources Domain
Presenters: Maria Brovelli and Rafael Moreno
Workbooks: Part 1, Part 2
Held September 26, 2014

Comparing UAS Auto-Correlated Derived Elevation Models With LiDAR for Sand Mine Stockpile Volumetrics
Presenters: Brian Murphy, Craig Emrick, and Apostolos "Tolee" Mamatas
Held October 10, 2014

Planetary-Scale Geospatial Analysis with Google Earth Engine
Presenters: David Thau
Held November 7, 2014

2013

How The District Uses Remote Sensed Data (Lidar, Imagery, Doppler Radar, Etc.) in Our Water Modeling
Presenter: Al Karlin, Florida Water Management District
Held March, 2013

3D Indoor Modeling for Navigation
Presenter:  Dr Sisi Zlatanova, Delft University of Technology - Netherlands
Held May, 2013

Approaches, Techniques, and Considerations for Land Use/Land Cover Change Mapping
Presenter:  John McCombs, NOAA
Held May, 2013

Social Research using Geospatial Technologies 
Presenters: Yvonne Olivares and Aaron Schill, Community Researcher Partners (CRP)
Held June, 2013

Open Source Software in Commercial GIS Sofware Applications
Presenter:  Michael Rosen, LizardTech Seattle, WA US
Held July 26, 2013

From DFIRM to the National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL):  Charting the Course of FEMA’s Digital Flood Hazard Data
Presenter: Scott McAfee, CFM, GISP FEMA - Mitigation Division Department of Homeland Security
Held August 30, 2013

FEMA’s Hazus Risk Assessment System – Technical Session on How to Use the Hurricane and Flood Models to Help Build Resilient Communities
Presenter: Chris Zambito, CFM, GISP, Project Manager for Water Resources in Dewberry
Held September 27, 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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